Wallabadah Rock

Wallabadah Rock is the second largest monolith in the Southern Hemisphere.

The base of the rock covers 61 hectares and it rises to 959 m above sea-level.

Wallabadah Rock is not accessible to the general public.  It is not possible to enter the private property.  

 

The rock is a large plug (959 m high) of an extinct volcano. There are spectacular flowering orchids in October.

The rock is on private property; with a good view from the road.

It is an ominous and powerful-looking mass of stone in a remote rural valley about 60 kilometres south of Tamworth.

 

 

Wallabadah Rock has been one of NSW’s best-kept secrets. During heavy rain, sheet-like waterfalls cascade down Wallabadah’s cliffs and on several occasions the twin peaks have been covered in snow.

But only once has it done anything more dramatic than release a few stones – during the Newcastle earthquake in 1989, the 300-metre-high, two-kilometre-long monolith rang like a terrifying bell.

 

 

 

The rainforests that snake up Wallabadah’s weather-formed gullies have never been studied by biologists, and earth scientists have only recently dated the plug of the extinct volcano at 45.5 million years. The rock would have been formed from molten material that cooled in the throat of the volcano, he said.

 

 

The base of the rock covers 61 hectares and it rises to 959 m above sea-level. It is possible to climb to the top. In October it is covered with flowering rock orchids